The Poor Law of Lunacy The Administration of Pauper Lunatics in Mid-Nineteenth-Century England by Peter Bartlett

Cover of: The Poor Law of Lunacy | Peter Bartlett

Published by Leicester University Press .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • British & Irish history: c 1700 to c 1900,
  • Disability: social aspects,
  • Mental health services,
  • Social history,
  • c 1800 to c 1900,
  • Government policy,
  • Commitment and detention,
  • Modern - 19th Century,
  • Psychology,
  • Law,
  • England,
  • History,
  • Biblical Studies - New Testament,
  • General,
  • Mental Illness,
  • Bible - Study - New Testament,
  • Mentally ill,
  • Psychiatric hospitals,
  • Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice,
  • Europe - Great Britain - General,
  • 19th century,
  • Institutional care

Book details

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages310
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7838527M
ISBN 100718501047
ISBN 109780718501044

Download The Poor Law of Lunacy

The text also examines the place of the county asylum movement in the poor law debates of The Poor Law of Lunacy book midth century. Using the Leicestershire asylum as a case study, the author looks at the role of the poor law officers in the admission processes of the asylum, and relations between poor law staff, asylum staff and the poor law and lunacy central : Hardcover.

The Poor Law of Lunacy. Most historians portray 19th-century county asylums as the exclusive realm of the asylum doctor, but Bartlett (law, U.

of Nottingham) argues that they should be thought of as an aspect of English poor law, in which the medical superintendent had remarkably little power.2/5(1). Poor Law and asylum law as a single strand: 3: The legislation of pauper lunacy: 4: The pragmatics of coexistence: local officials and pauper lunacy: 5: Local administration: the creation of coherence among misfits: 6: The Lunacy Commissioners and the soft centre of reform: 7: Conclusion: asylums, Poor Law and modernity: Appendices: 1Pages: The Poor Law of Lunacy.

Most historians portray 19th-century county asylums as the exclusive realm of the asylum doctor, but Bartlett (law, U. of Nottingham) argues that they should be thought of as an aspect of English poor law, in which the medical superintendent had remarkably little power. He examines the place of the county asylum movement in the midcentury poor law debates and its legal and.

Book Reviews: Peter Bartlett. The Poor Law of Lunacy: The Administration of Pauper Lunatics in Mid-Nineteenth Century England. London: Leicester University Press, Pp. £ ISBN Peter Bartlett and David Wright (eds).

Outside the Walls of the Asylum: the History of Care in the Community London: Athlone, Pp. About The Poor Law of Lunacy. In The Poor Law of Lunacy, Peter Bartlett examines the legal and administrative regime of the 19th-century asylum, arguing that it is to be thought of as an aspect of English poor law in which the medical superintendent of the asylum has little power.

The text also examines the place of the county asylum movement in the poor law debates of the midth. In The Poor Law of Lunacy, Peter Bartlett examines the legal and administrative regime of the 19th-century asylum, arguing that it is to be thought of as an aspect of English poor law in which the medical superintendent of the asylum has little power.

The text also examines the place of the county asylum movement in the poor law debates of the midth century. In this thesis, such care is placed in the context of the English poor law. The theory of the poor law was essentially silent on the treatment of the insane. That did not mean that developments in poor law had no effect only that the effects must be established by examination of administrative practices.

To that end, this thesis focuses on the networks of administration of the poor law of lunacy, from Cited by: 2. Poor Law of Lunacy", diss.

University of Londonesp. at chapter 1; The Poor Law of Lunacy (forthcoming, University of Leicester Press/Cassells). 4Figures drawn from annual reports of Commissioners in Lunacy, reflecting returns of local poor law officials.

In fact, provision may have been higher, since the LunacyFile Size: 74KB. The Poor Law of Lunacy: The Administration of Pauper Lunatics in Mid-nineteenth Century England Hardcover – 1 Oct. Author: Peter Bartlett. Farquharson, Lauren A ‘Scottish Poor Law of Lunacy’. Poor Law, Lunacy Law and Scotland’s parochial y of Psychiatry, Vol.

28, Issue. 1, by: The poor law of lunacy: the administration of pauper lunatics in mid-nineteenth-century England Peter Bartlett. London ; Washington: Leicester University Press, Prior to the Lunacy Act, lunacy legislation in England was enshrined in the County Asylums Act ofwhich established institutions for poor and for criminally-insane, mentally ill people.

The institutions were called asylums and they gave refuge where mental illness could receive proper treatment.

The asylum and the British state in the administration of pauper lunacy, – This chapter examines the role of the Poor Law, the Lunacy Commission and other government agencies in the origins and development of the Devon asylum from the middle decades of the nineteenth century until the outbreak of war in Author: Joseph Melling, Bill Forsythe.

In the introduction of the Poor Law Act, allowed parishes to unite in order to erect a workhouse for paupers but it stated that ‘nothing in this Act shall authorise the detention in any workhouse of any dangerous lunatic, insane person or idiot for longer than 14 days.

In The Poor Law of Lunacy, Peter Bartlett examines the legal and administrative regime of the 19th-century asylum, arguing that it is to be thought of as an aspect of English poor law in which the medical superintendent of the asylum has little power.

The text also examines the place of the county asylum movement in the poor law debates of the midth century. Using the Leicestershire asylum as a case study, the author looks at the role of the poor law officers in the admission processes of the asylum, and relations between poor law staff, asylum staff and the poor law and lunacy central.

Many of those considered to be insane in the past were regarded as paupers and so came within the ambit of the poor law. Little work has yet been published on the ways in which the poor law dealt with the psychologically disturbed during the era of the old poor law (c–).Cited by: 3.

The Poor Law Act and Lunatics Until the administration of poor relief was a parish responsibility, but under the Poor Law Act parishes could unite as a "Union" in order to erect a common workhouse. For each union a "Board of Guardians" was elected to administer the Poor Law.

Thomson, Mathew () The Poor Law of lunacy: The administration of pauper lunatics in mid-nineteenth century England. SOCIAL HISTORY, 27 (1). ISSN Research output not available from this repository, contact author. The poor law of lunacy: the administration of pauper lunatics in mid-nineteenth-century England.

[Peter Bartlett] -- Examining the legal and administrative regime of the 19th century asylum, this text argues that it is to be thought of as an aspect of English poor law, in which the medical superintendent of the. Naturally such an arrangement, with its confusion of Poor-law and lunacy administration, could not give satisfactory results.

Reforms have been carried, as one of the speakers of the States said ‘at the point of the bayonet,’ and so far as the insane are concerned remedial effort. Poor Law, in British history, body of laws undertaking to provide relief for the poor, developed in 16th-century England and maintained, with various changes, until after World War Elizabethan Poor Laws, as codified in –98, were administered through parish overseers, who provided relief for the aged, sick, and infant poor, as well as work for the able-bodied in workhouses.

The Elizabethan Poor Law of formalized earlier practices of poor relief contained in the Act for the Relief of the Poor yet is often cited as the beginning of the Old Poor Law system. It created a system administered at parish level, paid for by levying local rates on rate payers.

Read this book on Questia. Lunacy, Law, and Conscience, The Social History of the Care of the Insane by Kathleen Jones, | Online Research Library: Questia Read the full-text online edition of Lunacy, Law, and Conscience, The Social History of the Care of the Insane ().

♥ Book Title: The Poor Law of Lunacy ♣ Name Author: Peter Bartlett ∞ Launching: Info ISBN Link: ⊗ Detail ISBN code: ⊕ Number Pages: Total sheet ♮ News id: xSHUAwAAQBAJ Download File Start Reading ☯ Full Synopsis: "Most historians portray 19th-century county asylums as the exclusive realm of the asylum doctor, but Bartlett (law, U.

The Poor Law of lunacy: the administration of pauper lunatics in mid-nineteenth-century England By Peter Nolan Topics: Book ReviewsAuthor: Peter Nolan.

Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features The Poor Law Magazine for Scotland, Volume 2 of settlement parish or combination paro Parochial Board parochial relief parties patients pauper lunatics Peter Beattie Poor Law Act poor-rates poorhouse present pursuer question ragged schools.

Surviving the Lunacy Act of English Psychiatrists and Professional Development during the Early Twentieth Century - Volume 61 Issue 2 - Akinobu TakabayashiCited by: 4.

Poor Law, Lunacy Law and Scotland's parochial asylums. Farquharson L(1). Author information: (1)University of Glasgow, UK. Scotland's parochial asylums are unfamiliar institutional spaces. Representing the concrete manifestation of the collision between two spheres of legislation, the Poor Law and the Lunacy Law, six such asylums were Cited by: 2.

The Lancet THE LANCET. LONDON: SATURDAY, FEBRU POOR-LAW MEDICAL RELIEF. WE presume there now exists no question amongst any class of the community that some important alteration is needed in the scale of payment for Poor-law Medical Relief. Not even guardians can honestly doubt this.

The Poor Law had a profound impact on English society. Designed to reform the poor as much as to relieve poverty, it also shaped institutions of government and determined people's expectations and assumptions about social welfare.

The English Poor Law, provides a concise synthesis of recent scholarly work together with full references, explaining the origins of this unique system of. United Kingdom Acts of Parliament Gaming ActLunacy ActAuctioneers ActAberdeen Act, Poor Law Act LLC Books General Books LLC, - 24 pages.

The Lunacy Act of InParliament imposed new legislation on psychiatrists and lunatic asylums under pressure from public anxieties about wrongful confinement, which was engendered by newspapers and journals between the s and s.

16 In particular, the case of a Mrs Weldon drove the public to demand legal safeguards from wrongful confinement. 17 A politician sensitive to Cited by: 4.

The asylum story in Britain is a surprisingly long one, and goes back to well before the establishment of County asylums. The timeline of key debates and Acts of Parliament is a lengthy one, and encompasses the following moments: The new Bethlehem Hospital opens in.

** Peter Bartlett, The Poor Law of Lunacy: The Administration of Pauper Lunatics in Mid-Nineteenth-Century England (Leicester University Press, ). * John Walton, ‘The Treatment of Pauper Lunatics in Victorian England: The Case of Lancaster Asylum, 70’, in Madhouses, Mad-Doctors, and Madmen, pp.

Managing The Poor. In an old 17th c. Churchwardens’ Parochial Account Book (Poor Law Relief Book) discovered within a respectable (but poor parish), Southern English parish church of Cowden, is recorded in an early entry; after passing of the Elizabethan Poor Law.

(Sussex Archaeological Collections. Vol XX. As this paper will illustrate, 'idiots' and 'imbeciles' fell under two overlapping jurisdictions-the Poor Law Board and the Lunacy Commission.

The tension between the two systems led to a call for a different type of asylum-a hybrid of the county asylums and pauper workhouses-that was eventually constituted under the authority of the Cited by: 5. The Poor Law Amendment Act (PLAA) known widely as the New Poor Law, was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed by the Whig government of Earl completely replaced earlier legislation based on the Poor Law of and attempted to fundamentally change the poverty relief system in England and Wales (similar changes were made to the poor law for Scotland in ).Territorial extent: England and Wales.

In Earl Grey, the Prime Minister, set up a Poor Law Commission to examine the working of the poor Law system in their report published inthe Commission made several recommendations to Parliament.

As a result, the Poor Law Amendment Act was passed. The Rich, the Poor, and the Law Paperback – Janu by Josephine Mulvey (Author) out of 5 stars 3 ratings. See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and /5(3).

One of the identifiers for moral imbecility was to be in receipt of poor relief, unmarried and pregnant. In addition to two medical certificates testifying to lunacy the master of the asylum was also required to determine the sanity of the person being chances of you being committed were much higher if you were a woman – hysteria covered a multitude of criteria as did “female.A.

W. Ager, Crime and poverty in 19th Century England: The economy of makeshifts (), Bloomsbury. P. Bartlett, The Poor Law of lunacy: the administration of pauper lunatics in mid-nineteenth century England (), Leicester.

G. Boyer, An economic history of the English Poor Law, (), Cambridge University. A. Brundage, The English Poor Laws, (), Palgrave.

21407 views Saturday, November 7, 2020